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Not At Home At Home

February 10, 2012

This Sunday, I am preaching from a text in 1 Peter that includes chapter 2, verses 11-12.

11 Dear friends, I warn you as “temporary residents and foreigners” to keep away from worldly desires that wage war against your very souls. 12 Be careful to live properly among your unbelieving neighbors. Then even if they accuse you of doing wrong, they will see your honorable behavior, and they will give honor to God when he judges the world. (1 Peter 2:11-12, NLT)

As I have been preparing for this sermon, I ran across this. It is taken from “An Anonymous Brief for Christianity Presented to Diognetus” from the second century as quoted in the Cornerstone Biblical Commentary, Volume 18 (James, 1-2 Peter, Jude, Revelation). This is powerful stuff! Could the same be said about us today?

Christians are not different from the rest of men in nationality, speech, or customs; they do not live in states of their own, nor do they use a special language, nor adopt a peculiar way of life. Their teaching is not the kind of thing that could be discovered by the wisdom or reflection of mere active-minded men; indeed, they are not outstanding in human learning as others are. Whether fortune has given them a home in a Greek or foreign city, they follow local custom in the matter of dress, food, and way of life; yet the character of the culture they reveal is marvelous and, it must be admitted, unusual. They share in all duties like citizens and suffer all hardships like strangers. Every foreign land is for them a fatherland and every fatherland a foreign land. They marry like the rest of men and beget children, but they do not abandon the babies that are born. They share a common board, but not a common bed. In the flesh as they are, they do not live according to the flesh. They dwell on earth, but they are citizens of heaven. They obey the laws that men make, but their lives are better than the laws. They love all men, but are persecuted by all. They are unknown, and yet they are condemned. They are put to death, yet are more alive than ever. They are paupers, but they make many rich. They lack all things, and yet in all things they abound. They are dishonored, yet glory in their dishonor. They are maligned, and yet are vindicated. They are punished with the wicked. When they are punished, they rejoice, as though they were getting more of life. They are attacked by the Jews as Gentiles and are persecuted by the Greeks, yet those who hate them can give no reason for their hatred.

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3 Comments
  1. wjcollier3 permalink

    Bryan (chiefofleast),

    Thanks for the like. While I am not a Calvinist, I do like your blog. Come by anytime!

  2. wjcollier3 permalink

    Thanks Marcia. I appreciate that you take the time to read and comment!

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